FacebookInstagramTwitterContact

 

Generasi muda perlu berani terajui pembangunan           >>           Pengukuhan 'Maqasid Syar'iah' pemangkin kejayaan negara           >>           Berangkat ke Majlis Kesyukuran Ulang Tahun HK Ke-34           >>           Rumah Terbuka eratkan hubungan           >>           Rakyat Daerah Temburong panjatkan Doa Kesyukuran           >>           Puerto Rico's Arecibo Observatory Saved From Uncertain Fate           >>           23 Attorneys General Refile Challenge To FCC Net Neutrality Repeal           >>           Robinhood's Commission-Free Cryptocurrency Trading Is Live           >>           Organic Family Farm Ruined By Herbicide Drift: A Case Study (And Warning For Humanity)           >>           Castor Oil Is Great For Thickening And Regrowing Hair, Eyelashes And Eyebrows           >>          

 

SHARE THIS ARTICLE




REACH US


GENERAL INQUIRY

admin@brudirect.com

 

ADVERTISING

marketing@brudirect.com

 

PRESS RELEASE

pr@brudirect.com

 

HOTLINE

+673 222-0178 [Office Hour]

+673 223-6740 [Fax]

 



Upcoming Events


Brunei Gastronomy Week
February 23rd, 2018 | 08:00 AM


Negara Brunei Darussalam 34th National Day
February 23rd, 2018 | 10:00 AM





Prayer Times


The prayer times for Brunei-Muara and Temburong districts. For Tutong add 1 minute and for Belait add 3 minutes.


Imsak

: 05:06AM

Subuh

: 05:16AM

Syuruk

: 06:34AM

Doha

: 06:57AM

Zohor

: 12:35PM

Asar

: 03:53PM

Maghrib

: 06:34PM

Isyak

: 07:44PM

 



The Business Directory


 

 



Space & Science


  Home > Space & Science


Global Warming Vs. Solar Cooling: The Showdown Begins In 2020


These two large black spots on the sun, known as sunspots, appeared quickly in February 2013, and each is as wide across as six Earths. Credit: NASA/SDO/AIA/HMI/Goddard Space Flight Center

 


 February 14th, 2018  |  10:51 AM  |   612 views

SPACE.COM

 

The sun may be dimming, temporarily. Don't panic; Earth is not going to freeze over. But will the resulting cooling put a dent in the global warming trend?

 

A periodic solar event called a "grand minimum" could overtake the sun perhaps as soon as 2020 and lasting through 2070, resulting in diminished magnetism, infrequent sunspot production and less ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching Earth — all bringing a cooler period to the planet that may span 50 years.

 

The last grand-minimum event — a disruption of the sun's 11-year cycle of variable sunspot activity — happened in the mid-17th century. Known as the Maunder Minimum, it occurred between 1645 and 1715, during a longer span of time when parts of the world became so cold that the period was called the Little Ice Age, which lasted from about 1300 to 1850.

 

But it's unlikely that we'll see a return to the extreme cold from centuries ago, researchers reported in a new study. Since the Maunder Minimum, global average temperatures have been on the rise, driven by climate change. Though a new decades-long dip in solar radiation could slow global warming somewhat, it wouldn't be by much, the researchers' simulations demonstrated. And by the end of the incoming cooling period, temperatures would have bounced back from the temporary cooldown.

 

Sunspots, which appear as dark patches on the solar surface, form where the sun's magnetic field is unusually strong, and the number of sunspots waxes and wanes in a cycle that lasts about 11 years, fueled by fluctuations in the sun's magnetic field.

 

But during the late 17th century, the sun's spots all but disappeared. This episode corresponded with a period of exceptional cold in parts of the world, which scientists have explained as being connected to the changes in solar activity.  

 

Sunspot activity was high in 2014 and has been dipping ever since, as the sun moves toward the low end of its 11-year cycle, known as the solar minimum, NASA reported in June 2017. But a pattern of ever-decreasing sunspots over recent solar cycles resembles patterns from the past that preceded grand-minimum events. This similarity hints that another such event may be fast approaching, the researchers reported in the study.

 

And the scientists have estimated how intense such an event might be, by analyzing close to 20 years of data recording radiation output from stars that follow cycles similar to that of our sun. Solar radiation output typically drops during a normal solar minimum, though not enough to disrupt climate patterns on Earth. However, UV radiation output during a grand minimum could mean activity plummets by an additional 7 percent, the researchers wrote in the study. As a result, air temperatures on Earth's surface would cool by as much as several tenths of a degree Fahrenheit (a change of a half-degree F is the equivalent to about three-tenths of a degree Celsius) on average, according to the study.

 

The study's findings will help scientists create more accurate climate model simulations, to improve their understanding of the complex interplay between solar activity and climate on Earth, particularly in a warming world, the study's lead author, Dan Lubin, a research physicist with the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, said in a statement.

 

"We can therefore have a better idea of how changes in solar UV radiation affect climate change," he said.

 


 

Source:
courtesy of SPACE

by Mindy Weisberger

 

If you have any stories or news that you would like to share with the global online community, please feel free to share it with us by contacting us directly at pr@brudirect.com

 

Related News


Surprise Reunion For Teacher Turned Into Viral Video

 2018-02-23 10:08:35

Kim Jong-Nam Murder: Suspects 'Were Paid For TV Pranks'

 2018-02-23 10:16:06

Funds Clash Over Which Way the Australian Dollar Is Headed

 2018-02-23 10:53:26